Why Sirius works

Shaun Carter describes why Sirius was successful after “the utopian idea of early last century – to put people in a tall tower – fundamentally failed throughout the west. England and France have tonnes of these. They fundamentally disregarded the street. The moment we give up on the street, we give up on things like community, public surveillance and an activated street edge. With Sirius, the building addresses the street. Many units directly open onto the street. Sirius never tried to disassociate itself from the community. It was integral to the community.”

Above are exterior views of Sirius and below are recent interior shots of the Phillip Room, the foyer and the first-floor Gallery. These common areas have fostered community interaction within Sirius but residents have been progressively denied access to these spaces and to the roof gardens and terraces.

The running animals throughout the ground-floor common areas are often misinterpreted. A member of the design team that created Sirius, architect Penny Rosier created these abstract animals to echo the prehistoric animal drawings in European caves, simply because these common areas have a cave-like feeling.

The final two images are interiors that were set up in 1980 to show what it would be like to live in a Sirius apartment. To see what it is now like to live in Sirius, see here.

 

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