Bill

Bill
Bill Ford, interviewed in 2005 for The Millers Point Oral History Project

For most kids growing up in Millers Point the job opportunities were that you became a wharfie, you became a storeman, you became a tugman, or if you had local political connections you could get a job in the Council, which was a much more secure system. Their parents, having gone through the tremendous insecurity of the 1930s wanted some sort of security and apprenticeships were seen as the most secure way, not to escape the waterfront but to have security in life. The Daily Mirror interviewed me when I won the Fulbright Scholarship and the title was No Hoper Makes Good.

The northern end of The Hungry Mile was here in Towns Place, just at the bottom where it joins Dalgety Road, that was the northern end of The Hungry Mile. It went along Hickson Road to the southern end of The Hungry Mile where the other waterside workers’ pick-up centre was. So the waterside workers had to come to either of these and you walked The Hungry Mile between.